Yohan Davit

Yohan Davit: About me

I'm a research scientist at CNRS (CR2 ), working in the porous media group which is part of the Institute of Fluids Mechanics of Toulouse. I'm also a 2020 science associate fellow (an EPSRC program in the UK). My background is in physics with a special interest in working at the interface with mathematics and biology. You will find a brief summary of my education and a detailed CV, here.

My different positions led me to study a variety of objects, with a common muse however: their multiscale nature. I've studied the rheology of confined suspensions and its application to blood flow through capillaries, worked on upscaling/imaging transport phenomena in porous media colonized by biofilms, developed cellular-level models of biological tissues, and studied the relationship between these discrete microscale models and their continuum mesoscale counterpart. I came across methods as contrasted as:

  • homogenization via volume averaging and multiscale asymptotics,
  • agile programming in C++,
  • cellular level models of biological tissues,
  • X-ray tomography (including synchrotron-based),
  • biological methods related to bacterial biofilms,
  • and microfluidics.

My current research builds upon this variety of approaches to study complex systems such as porous media, biofilms and biological tissues.

Education

  • Dec. 2012-Now: Chargé de recherche, CNRS – Institute of Fluids Mechanics, Toulouse, FR.
  • 2011-2012: PostDoc, University of Oxford - Mathematical Institute, Oxford, UK.
    Cellular level models of biological tissues (Chaste project), discrete-to-continuum homogenization and hybrid discrete-continuous models. H. Byrne, D. Gavaghan, J. Osborne, J. Pitt-Francis.
  • 2007-2010: Institute of Fluids Mechanics, Toulouse, FR.
    Multiscale analysis of transport phenomena in porous media with biofilms. Advisors: G. Debenest, M. Gerino.
  • 2006–2007: M.S., Physics for life sciences, University Joseph Fourier, Grenoble.
    Rheology of confined suspensions and its application to blood flows through capillaries. Advisor: P. Peyla.

Download C.V.

You'll find a more detailed CV here.
(Right click the link and choose "Save Link As..." to save the document to your computer)

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